Cycletherapy, that's what they wanna give me!

Blurbing books is kind of a weird practice. I mean, it's actually a very good idea, and I for one always notice who's been quoted on the back (and sometimes front) of a book I'm considering reading. But I can tell you, as someone who's written two books and was asked by her publisher to do so, seeking these blurbs out is a bit scary and awkward (though probably most people are very kind about it, as the writers I asked were). Famous and sought-after writers probably get asked to write blurbs often, which must be something of a nuisance. Lucky for me I'm more infamous than famous, and am sought after by only a highly select few!

Elly Blue, the author of several excellent books on biking, asked me to read and consider writing a blurb for her new one, an anthology she edited called Cycletherapy: Grief and Healing on Two Wheels, put out this month by Microcosm Publishing. Elly is also the co-owner of Microcosm, which published my two books, White Elephants and Slip of the Tongue. Microcosm has been knocking it out of the park lately, if I may say so. My hubby Joe and I tabled for them at the Small Press Expo last weekend, and their books were a huge hit there. (Joe is also a Microcosm author.) SPX is comics-oriented, and Microcosm does indeed have some comics titles on its roster (the Henry & Glenn series being the best known and, frankly, awesomest), but other types of books were flying off our temporary shelves, too: The DIY ones by Raleigh Briggs; the more overtly political and wonderfully-titled The CIA Makes Science Fiction Unexciting; the silly-yet-totally-serious Manspressions, which makes fun of machismo using made-up words and charming illustrations; and yeah, my own pocket-sized memoir, White Elephants.

Cycletherapy was too new to make it to the expo, but it's out now, and I've got my copy here. It's a beautiful book. Highlights include Elly's own essay, in which she writes about carting her partner around on a bamboo bike trailer on days when he's too sick to bike himself; a short piece by Sara Tretter that touches on the awkwardness of burgeoning teenage sexuality; Julie Brooks' chronicle of working through the grief she experienced after being struck by a car while riding her bike (she's okay now); and Gretchen Lair's fine illustration of her beloved bike Ariel, who was stolen days after their last trip to the beach together. She quotes The Tempest: "My quaint Ariel ... Our revels are now ended."

Lookit all their bike books!

I'm not a biker, not since childhood, really. I've always felt a little too chicken to get around the city on a bike, like so many of my friends do. (They've all been doored by parked cars or clipped by moving ones. Plus, I love to plug in and listen to music while I'm out and about, which isn't such a hot idea when you're riding a bike in traffic.) But I am a big walker. I walk everywhere because I don't drive a car, and never have: My mode of transportation is my own two legs, plus whatever SEPTA conveyance I feel like catching. But I walk for pleasure and exercise and for my mental health, too. A lot of what the folks in this anthology (all but one of them women) wrote about biking resonated with me because I use long walks the same way, to keep my mind and body healthy and strong. Some days I push through physical discomfort or miserable heat and humidity to get to that feeling that my physical self isn't creaky and cranky and tired, but like a well-oiled machine, taking me where I need to go. Going out in the evening is different, like gliding through dark water, thoughtful and quiet. I prefer to walk through city neighborhoods because I like to look at buildings and people, and peer down little alleyways and see grass growing up between the cracks in the concrete. But I live just up the street from the Schuylkill River, which has a paved path for walkers and bikers that runs alongside it all the way into downtown Philly from a little town 25 miles from here called Oaks. Sometimes I'll walk down to the trail and stay on it till I reach the part of the river where the rowers practice, past their charming boathouses and the sleek boats themselves, sluicing through the water. I move my body to get my head feeling right and it always helps, at least a little, which is more or less what the stories in this book are about. It's good to be reminded how useful that can be.